ARTIST STATEMENT

 

   Match 6-39

Match 6-39

My work is meant to be engaging, serious, funny, awkward, of the moment, empowering, and relatable. At its most successful it appeals to the viewer both visually and emotionally and encourage them to reassess the relationship they have to the world around them and their personal impact as human beings.

My curiosity in the studio tends to land me in creative conundrums that expand my knowledge of methodologies and materials.

Match/Enemy consists of over 200 watercolor “portraits” of men that were matched to my own profile by the online dating app OkCupid. Displayed on a grid, the portraits incorporate the percentage of Match and Enemy. Percentages are calculated by an algorithm when users answer questions within the app.

   How the Wind Blows

How the Wind Blows

Thus, Match/Enemy is a visual summary of the artists’ experience. These portraits examine the social and personal ramifications of what dating and being single mean at the beginning of the 21st century, the way we present ourselves on digital platforms as opposed to “real life”, how we adopt a persona, how intimacy can be commodified, and how a number and a single picture represent who we might best be suited for.

Triple Point, my newest body of work, explores the nature of memory and humanity’s capacity to understand its relationship to water in all of its forms; liquid, gaseous, and solid. Each aspect of Triple Point explores separate themes within the work that intertwine environmental and political ideas and act as catalysts for contemplation. 

Water-based media and sometimes even solid water (ice and snow) are used to create the works in an attempt to wrestle with the difficulties of understanding a rapidly changing environment.

The installation Lift (for Faith) that evolved into In the Space of a Day encourages the viewers to let go of solid ground, revelling in the moment, contemplating large watercolors representing clouds slowly moving to the hum of a gentle (artificial) wind.